Saturated fat does not clog the arteries

Fresh from the BMJ:

“Saturated fat does not clog the arteries: coronary heart disease is a chronic inflammatory condition, the risk of which can be effectively reduced from healthy lifestyle interventions”
Fascinating read, not that anyone following a ZC diet doesn’t already know this, but nevertheless it is good to see reports like this appearing in a credible medical journal.
I especially like this paragraph taken from the report:
“Coronary artery disease pathogenesis and treatment urgently requires a paradigm shift. Despite popular belief among doctors and the public, the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong. A landmark systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies showed no association between saturated fat consumption and (1) all-cause mortality, (2) coronary heart disease (CHD), (3) CHD mortality, (4) ischaemic stroke or (5) type 2 diabetes in healthy adults.1 Similarly in the secondary prevention of CHD there is no benefit from reduced fat, including saturated fat, on myocardial infarction, cardiovascular or all-cause mortality.2 It is instructive to note that in an angiographic study of postmenopausal women with CHD, greater intake of saturated fat was associated with less progression of atherosclerosis whereas carbohydrate and polyunsaturated fat intake were associated with greater progression.3 “

 

47 reasons why fructose will dissolve your elbows

Fantastic! Re-blogged to my carnivore blog 🙂

Zero-a-day.

Fructose won’t really make your elbows dissolve. Don’t worry. It was just a ‘typical blog headline’.

And I don’t have 47 reasons either. So if that’s what you were expecting, click away now. If, on the other hand, you’re interested in whether fructose is a positive or negative element in your diet, then read on…

In my last blog I mentioned how fructose doesn’t trigger the normal satiation signalling, so humans are prone to gorge on fruit, which might be an evolutionary mechanism that would help us, and other mammals, put on fat over autumn in order to survive winter – ‘scheduled obesity’.

Now that fruit is available in unlimited quantities and at all times, the amount of fructose coursing through our systems is far greater than our liver’s capacity to deal with it.  But guess what – the food available to humans today is different from 40,000 years ago…

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Usable Protein Contained in Eggs Versus Rice and Beans

Very good points made here!

Life-Systems Engineering Science by Professor Brian Peskin

An egg white is an ideal protein with a rating of 100% digestibility. On the other hand, the protein in brown rice is ONLY 59% usable and that in beans is ONLY 49% usable because of their fiber and other anti-nutritional factors such as those mentioned in [a 2005 report by the Association of Official Analytical Chemists International (AOAC)]. Therefore, the usability of the protein in rice and beans is approximately half that of an egg!

Now, couple this with the fact that the rice and beans contain only about half the quantity of protein that is in a comparable quantity of eggs. So rice and beans have half the protein of eggs, and THAT protein is only half as usable as that in eggs. This means that the rice and beans have AT MOST a mere one-fourth the usable protein amount of eggs. No problem, you say – I’ll…

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Proof that you can eat meat for years and thrive on it!

via When Eating Only Meat Becomes A Way of Life! Family Lives On Only meat For The Past 17 Years.

Connecting the Dots Between Sugar & Cancer …What If?

Brilliant article by Tim Rice (unlearn – rethink).

Source: Connecting the Dots Between Sugar & Cancer …What If?

The One With all the Beef Mince: Zero Carb Minced Beef Recipes

OK, so I made the fatal mistake of asking the gang on Zero Carb UK Facebook group to hit me with their favourite ways to prepare and eat minced beef.  Oh boy, did they respond and then some!

So, here is a bit of a messy throw-together of tips, recipes and cooking methods for the wonderful staple of minced beef. The type of mince used here is down to personal preference. I tend to favour the fattier end of the market and use 80/20 mince (20% fat) but others may prefer leaner mince. Mince is considered lean if it has 7% or less fat. The percentage is clearly shown on packaging labels. You can ask your butcher about the fat content when buying it loose by weight. Continue reading “The One With all the Beef Mince: Zero Carb Minced Beef Recipes”